Kaylé Brecher is reviewed by Take Effect with her new album Kayleidoscope

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Kayle Brecher

TAKE EFFECT

Kaylé Brecher

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Kayleidoscope

Penchant Four, 2020

8/10

Listen to Kayleidoscope

The jazz vocalist, composer, lyricist and arranger Kaylé Brecher (pronounced KaylA BrecKer) is well versed in many variations of jazz sounds, and here on this 8th recording the songstress offers us a fine mix of originals and covers with a handful of players to help flesh out the affair.

“My Favorite Things” starts the listen with soft keys and calm percussion as Brecher’s pretty vocals guide the gentle jazz setting, and “Glad Bag” follows with a playful display of spirited guitar work as Brecher shows us her impressive and versatile singing prowess.

Near the middle, “Something About You” initially finds a more sparse place to reside as primarily piano accompanies her adaptive pipes that eventually hint at rapping as the setting becomes abruptly quirky, while “Shattered” is nearly a capella, as a plucked acoustic bass pairs with Bobby McFerrin like vocal scatting. “An Elegant Tale”, the album highlight, then brings a busier display of breezy grooves and Afro-Cuban influences that add much to the engaging atmosphere.

Deeper into the listen, “Sea Of Dolphins” puts keys into focus to help birth glorious melodies that tips its hat to Herbie Hancock, and “Remember It Well” exits the listen with just Brecher’s vocals in the brief and emotive finish to a vary accomplished effort.

An artist who began her career in her teens singing the blues in New York City clubs, Brecher brings a wealth of talent and experience here, where minimal songs resonate just as well as fuller ones in her rhythmic and harmonic execution that we could never tire of.

Travels well with: Lois BrunoAnd So It Begins; Raquel CepedaPassion

Kari Gaffney

Kari Gaffney

Since 1988 Kari-On Productions has helped artists get an even footing in the industry through jazz promotion in the genres of Jazz, World & Latin Jazz through Jazz Radio and Publicity. Why do we do both, because they compliment each other, and we care about fiscal longevity for the artist.

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