Kayle Brecher is reviewed by Take Effect with Bredux: collected edges

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Kayle Brecher

TAKE EFFECT

by Tom Haugen

KAYLÉ BRECHER

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Bredux Collected Edges

Penchant Four, 2021

9/10

Listen to Bredux Collected Edges

The extremely eclectic jazz vocalist Kaylé Brecher gets ultra creative for this 9th effort, where she arranges 11 tunes in her inimitable vision that embraces fusion with much adventurousness.

“Wild Child (World of Trouble)” starts the listen with playful drumming as dense bass and soulful trumpet complement Brecher’s very diverse and animated vocals, and “So Complicated”, an original, follows with a flurry of saxophones as Brecher pulls off a stunning vocal performance in a very expressive climate.

Elsewhere, “Cool” recruits warm keys and a timeless jazz spirit that’s as stylish as it is memorable, while “Back To The Red Clay” zips around with spirited guitar work, acrobatic drumming and Brecher’s inviting singing and scatting. “Choices”, a truly exceptional track, then benefits much from atmosphere alongside a more forceful approach that embodies all the hallmarks of jazz that we will never tire of.

“So It Goes” arrives near the end and pairs adventurous brass with an almost tribal feel as Brecher injects her frisky singing amid some Latin nods, and “Spy Music (Alternate Track)” bops and flows with a quirky, irresistible energy that certainly warrants this 2nd version.

A very involved project that welcomes 5 bassists, 3 guitarists, 2 keyboardists, 5 drummers, 4 percussionists, and plenty of brass and woodwinds, Brecher keeps the quality of her song craft as strong as anything she’s done, which, if you’re familiar with her back catalog, is a compliment to the highest degree.

Travels well with: Kristin CallahanLost In A Dream; Alex MartinFolk Songs, Jazz Journeys

Kari Gaffney

Kari Gaffney

Since 1988 Kari-On Productions has helped artists get an even footing in the industry through jazz promotion in the genres of Jazz, World & Latin Jazz through Jazz Radio and Publicity. Why do we do both, because they compliment each other, and we care about fiscal longevity for the artist.

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