Prominent premiere jazz saxophone Nicholas Brust – Frozen In Time

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Nick Brust

 

Prominent premiere jazz saxophone Nicholas Brust – Frozen In Time

Prominent premiere jazz saxophone Nicholas Brust

Prominent premiere jazz saxophone Nicholas Brust – FROZEN IN TIME:   If you’ve been looking for prominent premiere jazz saxophone, you need look no further, folks… here’s a clip (from a much earlier show) that will give you an up close and personal experience of his totally talented playing on the album opener, “Work Ahead“…

…since you’re there already, be sure to SUBSCRIBE to Nick’s YouTube Channel, where you’ll find many more great performances.

The whole crew is high-energy… you’ll get to hear Nicholas Brust, saxophone; Ben Eunson, guitar; Tuomo Uusitalo, piano; Josh Allen, bass and Jay Sawyer, drums in all their glory… DJ’s across the globe will be spinning the 3:46 “Something Like A Storm” regularly… full-bodied and jammed with emotion and action!

If your mood is a bit more melancholy, you’ll enjoy Nicholas’s tribute to the injustices going on in our world today… “Hymnal For Those In Need” cries out poignantly for those around us who are so in need.

You’ll find the closer, “A Shifting State“, may be a bit of a challenge if you’re a “regular M.O.R.” jazz fan… of course, we don’t have many of those in our readership, so I have a feeling you’re going to love this track as much as I did!

When peace is your passion, songs like the beautiful 6:47 “Brooklyn Folk Song” will be the perfect tune to put on your headphones and run with… an absolutely perfect “pace” is established on this totally calming piece of music.

I give Nicholas and his musical cohorts a MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED rating, with an “EQ” (energy quotient) score of 4.99 for this superb album… visit Nicholas’s website to get more information.

Kari Gaffney

Kari Gaffney

Since 1988 Kari-On Productions has helped artists get an even footing in the industry through jazz promotion in the genres of Jazz, World & Latin Jazz through Jazz Radio and Publicity. Why do we do both, because they compliment each other, and we care about fiscal longevity for the artist.

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